Bread and Other Edible Agents of Mental Disease

  • Department of General Psychology, University of Padua, Padova, Italy

Perhaps because gastroenterology, immunology, toxicology, and the nutrition and agricultural sciences are outside of their competence and responsibility, psychologists and psychiatrists typically fail to appreciate the impact that food can have on their patients’ condition. Here we attempt to help correct this situation by reviewing, in non-technical, plain English, how cereal grains—the world’s most abundant food source—can affect human behavior and mental health. We present the implications for the psychological sciences of the findings that, in all of us, bread (1) makes the gut more permeable and can thus encourage the migration of food particles to sites where they are not expected, prompting the immune system to attack both these particles and brain-relevant substances that resemble them, and (2) releases opioid-like compounds, capable of causing mental derangement if they make it to the brain. A grain-free diet, although difficult to maintain (especially for those that need it the most), could improve the mental health of many and be a complete cure for others.

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Inclined Bed Therapy – Surprising Benefits for Sleeping, Headaches, Diabetes, ADHD/ADD, Brain Health, MS, etc!

The Surprising Benefits of Inclined Bed Therapy

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  • Raising the head of your bed 6 inches so that your you’re sleeping on a 5-degree incline may improve your blood circulation, metabolism, respiratory, neurological and immune function
  • Inclined bed therapy may also ease symptoms associated with Alzheimer’s, diabetes, glaucoma, migraines, multiple sclerosis, sleep apnea, acid reflux, edema, varicose veins and more

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How to Stop Attacking Yourself: 9 Steps to Heal Autoimmune Disease.

Inflammation is a “hot” topic in medicine.

It appears connected to almost every known chronic disease—from heart disease to cancer, diabetes to obesity, autism to dementia, and even depression.

Other inflammatory diseases such as allergies, asthma, arthritis, and autoimmune disease are increasing at dramatic rates. As physicians we are trained to shut off inflammation with aspirin, anti-inflammatory medication such as Advil or Motrin, steroids, and increasingly more powerful immune suppressing medication with serious side effects.

But we are not trained to find and treat the underlying causes of inflammation in chronic disease. Hidden allergens, infections, environmental toxins, an inflammatory diet, and stress are the real causes of these inflammatory conditions. Continue reading

Fiber Provides Food to Your Gut Microbes That They Ferment to Shape Your DNA

By Dr. Mercola

Your body is a complex ecosystem made up of more than 100 trillion bacteria, fungi, viruses, and protozoa, collectively referred to as your microbiome, which must be properly balanced and cared for if you want to maintain good health.
These microbes are so numerous they actually outnumber the cells in your body 10 to one. With such a high prevalence of microbes in your system, it seems reasonable to suspect that they’re of some major importance.

Antibacterial soap, as they too kill off both good and bad bacteria, and contribute to the development of antibiotic-resistance.

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Why You Should Soak Nuts Before Eating Them?

by Dr Janardhana Hebbar

Soaking helps to get rid of phytic acid and neutralizing enzyme inhibitors enabling easy digestion and elevating absorption of vitamins and other nutrients in the nuts. The peels are more easily removable, once you soak nuts in hot water. Adding a little salt while soaking will help neutralize the enzymes. It also helps remove dust residue and tannins. The water residue from the soaked nuts must not be re-used for cooking as they might contain harmful substances.

Just like grains, nuts contain phytic acid which is part of their defense mechanism to avoid predators so that they can grow to their full maturity. Often, you may find some bits of nuts in your stools because phytic acid works against easy digestion of the nuts. Soaking helps to get rid of phytic acid and neutralizing enzyme inhibitors enabling easy digestion and elevating absorption of vitamins and other nutrients in the nuts. Continue reading

Scientific Links Between Processed Foods and Depression

By Dr. Joseph Mercola

Research shows that the food you eat can have a profound effect on your mental health. So, regardless of your mental health problems, the importance of addressing your diet simply cannot be overstated.

In a very real sense, you have two brains — one in your head, and one in your gut. Both are created from the same tissue during fetal development, and they’re connected via your vagus nerve, the tenth cranial nerve that runs from your brain stem to your abdomen.  It is now well established that the vagus nerve is the primary route your gut bacteria use to transmit information to your brain, which helps explain why mental health appears to be so intricately connected to your gut microbiome 1 — the bacteria and other microbes living in your gut. Continue reading

Bone Broth—A Most Nourishing Food for Virtually Any Ailment

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  • Bone broth has a long history of medicinal use. Traditionally, it has been associated with gut healing, and many modern diseases appear to be rooted in gut dysfunction
  • Digestive problems and joint problems in particular can be successfully addressed using bone broth, but it’s really a foundational component of a healing diet regardless of what ails you
  • Bone broth is also a staple remedy for acute illnesses such as cold and flu. Processed, canned soups will not work as well as the homemade version
  • Bone broth contains a variety of valuable nutrients in a form your body can easily absorb and use
  • The more gelatinous the broth, the more nourishing it will tend to be. To make it as gelatinous as possible, add chicken feet, pig’s feet, and/or joint bones

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Six Reasons Probiotics Will Give You Radiant Health and Beauty

Sunday, July 07, 2013 by: Angela Doss

(NaturalNews) Humans have more than 10 times the number of bacteria in their body than they have cells – about 100 trillion, representing more than 500 different species. When in proper balance, a delicate and precise ratio of 85 percent friendly bacteria to 15 percent “unfriendly” bacteria, the human organism quite naturally heals itself. But when something upsets that delicate balance, be it general lack of nutrition, exposure to certain or numerous toxins (depending on the individual) or a medically prescribed course of antibiotics, problems can arise. Under these desperate conditions, the body shifts into survival mode (sympathetic nervous system), bringing its own innate healing abilities (parasympathetic nervous state) to a slow or full stop. Continue reading