Why You Should Soak Nuts Before Eating Them?

by Dr Janardhana Hebbar

Soaking helps to get rid of phytic acid and neutralizing enzyme inhibitors enabling easy digestion and elevating absorption of vitamins and other nutrients in the nuts. The peels are more easily removable, once you soak nuts in hot water. Adding a little salt while soaking will help neutralize the enzymes. It also helps remove dust residue and tannins. The water residue from the soaked nuts must not be re-used for cooking as they might contain harmful substances.

Just like grains, nuts contain phytic acid which is part of their defense mechanism to avoid predators so that they can grow to their full maturity. Often, you may find some bits of nuts in your stools because phytic acid works against easy digestion of the nuts. Soaking helps to get rid of phytic acid and neutralizing enzyme inhibitors enabling easy digestion and elevating absorption of vitamins and other nutrients in the nuts. Continue reading

Scientific Links Between Processed Foods and Depression

By Dr. Joseph Mercola

Research shows that the food you eat can have a profound effect on your mental health. So, regardless of your mental health problems, the importance of addressing your diet simply cannot be overstated.

In a very real sense, you have two brains — one in your head, and one in your gut. Both are created from the same tissue during fetal development, and they’re connected via your vagus nerve, the tenth cranial nerve that runs from your brain stem to your abdomen.  It is now well established that the vagus nerve is the primary route your gut bacteria use to transmit information to your brain, which helps explain why mental health appears to be so intricately connected to your gut microbiome 1 — the bacteria and other microbes living in your gut. Continue reading

Bone Broth—A Most Nourishing Food for Virtually Any Ailment

Story at-a-glance

  • Bone broth has a long history of medicinal use. Traditionally, it has been associated with gut healing, and many modern diseases appear to be rooted in gut dysfunction
  • Digestive problems and joint problems in particular can be successfully addressed using bone broth, but it’s really a foundational component of a healing diet regardless of what ails you
  • Bone broth is also a staple remedy for acute illnesses such as cold and flu. Processed, canned soups will not work as well as the homemade version
  • Bone broth contains a variety of valuable nutrients in a form your body can easily absorb and use
  • The more gelatinous the broth, the more nourishing it will tend to be. To make it as gelatinous as possible, add chicken feet, pig’s feet, and/or joint bones

Continue reading

Six Reasons Probiotics Will Give You Radiant Health and Beauty

Sunday, July 07, 2013 by: Angela Doss

(NaturalNews) Humans have more than 10 times the number of bacteria in their body than they have cells – about 100 trillion, representing more than 500 different species. When in proper balance, a delicate and precise ratio of 85 percent friendly bacteria to 15 percent “unfriendly” bacteria, the human organism quite naturally heals itself. But when something upsets that delicate balance, be it general lack of nutrition, exposure to certain or numerous toxins (depending on the individual) or a medically prescribed course of antibiotics, problems can arise. Under these desperate conditions, the body shifts into survival mode (sympathetic nervous system), bringing its own innate healing abilities (parasympathetic nervous state) to a slow or full stop. Continue reading

You Might Want to Stay With the Colonoscopy

“It’s like drinking a dozen Guinness stouts compressed into one. But with a soapy aftertaste. Like soapy anchovies. ” Mmmm! That was my friend’s attempt to describe the “worst thing I ever put in my mouth.”  That “thing” is a laxative drink. It’s the notorious colonoscopy prep. You have to drink a few liters of it the night before your procedure.  Ask anyone who’s been there and done that. After the laxative, the colonoscopy is a breeze.

But all that is in the past now, according to the Mayo Clinic. Doctors there have developed a new laxative in pill form. Easy! Unfortunately, there’s a catch. And it’s a HUGE catch.  So here’s fair warning… Don’t fall for it. Continue reading

How to Easily and Inexpensively Ferment Your Own Vegetables

Although you can use a crock pot, culturing your veggies directly in glass Mason jars,  eliminates the need for a crock pot and eliminates a transfer step in the process. This also allows you to make smaller batches, and it eliminates the presence of wild yeasts which can occur when using a crock. These yeasts tend to give the food a cheesy sort of flavor, which many find unpalatable.

Here’s a quick summary of Caroline’s recipe for how to make your own fermented veggies: Continue reading

10 Tips for Using Apple Cider Vinegar and More

by Willow Tohi    

                                                                                                                                                    (NaturalNews) If time is a teacher, one thing we know is that apple cider vinegar is good stuff. The Babylonians used it as a tonic in 5000 B.C. so its been around for a while. It was also used in ancient Egypt (3000 B.C.) and by Samurai warriors in Japan (1200 B.C.), so it’s grandfathered in – doesn’t need a double-blind study to prove its effectiveness. Continue reading

Using Manuka Honey (Where To Find It & Eight Ways to Use Honey)

Thursday, May 24, 2012 by: Jonathan Benson

(NaturalNews) Throughout history, honey has played an important role in cultures around the world not only as a food, but also as a medicine. And manuka honey in particular, which is derived from the nectar collected by honey bees that forage the manuka bushes (Leptospermum scoparium) of New Zealand, contains unique antibacterial, antiviral, anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiseptic, stomach-healing, wound-repairing, and overall health-promoting properties that make it an amazing “superfood” worthy of further investigation. Continue reading